Font Size: AAA

Pamlico County (1872)

Settled in the early-eighteenth century by Welsh, Swiss, French, English, and German immigrants, Pamlico County was originally occupied by the Algonquian and Pampticoe (or Pamlico). These tribes referred to their land as “TaTaku” or “where the land and the sea meet the sky.” The Pamlico tribe nearly dissipated after a smallpox endemic in 1696. John Lawson, on his excursion through the Carolinas, found only fifteen survivors in 1709. Many Native Americans, including the Pamlico, left the region and joined the Tuscarora after the Tuscarora War (1711-1713).

The immigrants who settled present-day Pamlico endured a tough journey due to the colony's isolated location and the many rivers and tributaries that made land travel difficult. A peninsula bestrewn with numerous rivers, bays, and creeks, Pamlico is located on the coast of North Carolina, and it is named for the Pamlico Sound that borders the county to the east. In addition to its vast coastline, Pamlico holds other natural characteristics such as Deep Run, Dawson Creek, Bay City Pocosin, and Cedar Island.

Established in 1872, Pamlico was originally part of the Craven and Beaufort counties. Due to its location on the coast of North Carolina and its tributaries, Pamlico’s county seat is named Bayboro. The seat was incorporated in 1881, named for the Bay River. Pamlico holds other communities and towns such as Arapahoe, Vandemere, Hobucken, Oriental, Pamlico, and Mesic.

Tourism is Pamlico’s primary industry, as many fishermen and sailors visit the county during the summer months to enjoy the natural resources of the area. The small town of Oriental is known as the “Sailing Capital of North Carolina.” Every year numerous regattas, or boat races, are performed in Pamlico, and one of the most popular races is the Oriental Regatta.

Various historical and cultural institutions exist in Pamlico County. Two early-twentieth century mills exist in the county: The Reel Cotton Gin (1905) and the Grist Mill (1915). Some cultural institutions include the Pamlico County Drama Club, the Silver Hill Heritage Museum, and the Candycane Theatre. Since the mid-1950s, Pamlico County has hosted several YMCA summer camps, and the popular Pamlico County Croaker Festival.

In the early-twentieth century, Pamlico County helped transform the transportation system of the North Carolina public schools. During the early 1900s, the Pamlico school board and superintendent sought an easier transportation method for its students. Once the county earned enough tax revenue, the board bought a motorized school bus from the Corbett Company of Henderson. Able to carry thirty students, the new school bus was used to transport children within the Oriental Consolidated School district. The motorized school bus ushered in the beginning of North Carolina’s school bus system.


Sources:

“Pamlico County; Pamlico Indians.” William S. Powell, ed. Encyclopedia of North Carolina (University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC 2006).

“Pamllico County.” Pamlico Government website. http://www.co.pamlico.nc.us/, (accessed November 9, 2011).

“First Motorized School Bus.” North Carolina Highway Historical Marker Program website. A Division of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. http://www.ncmarkers.com/Results.aspx?k=Search&ct=btn, (accessed November 9, 2011).

By Jonathan Martin, North Carolina History Project


See Also:

Related Categories: Counties
Related Encyclopedia Entries: Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Raleigh), The Wachovia Tract, Yonaguska (1760?-1839), Juan Pardo Expeditions, Moyano's Foray (1567), Joara, Grandfather Mountain, Tuscarora War, Yamasee War, Henry Berry Lowry (1845 - ?) , Montfort Stokes (1762 – 1842), Davidson County (1822), Stanly County (1841), Gaston County (1846), Burke County (1777), Haywood County (1808), Ashe County (1799), Surry County (1771), Yadkin County (1850), Transylania County (1861), Orange County (1752), Perquimans County (1668), Avery County (1911), Alexander County (1847), Robeson County (1787), Greene County (1791), Currituck County (1668), Iredell County (1788), McDowell County (1842), Macon County (1828), Hertford County (1759), Rutherford County (1779), Mitchell County (1861), Columbus County (1808), Jackson County (1851), Wilson County (1855), Judaculla Rock, Rutherford's Campaign, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Catawba College, Pilot Mountain, Uwharrie National Forest, Pisgah National Forest, Cherokee Indians, Catawba Indians, Town Creek Indian Mound, The Tuscarora, Lake Mattamuskeet, Saponi Indians, The Pee Dee Indians, Catawba Indians, Chowanoac Indians, Waccamaw Indians, Manteo, Arthur Dobbs (1689-1765), Edward Vail (1717-1777), Edenton Tea Party, Bunker Hill Covered Bridge, Carteret County (1722), Robert Howe (1732-1786), Republicanism, William Hooper (1742-1790), Watauga Association, Cross Creek, William Richardson Davie (1756-1820), Alfred Moore (1755-1810), Principles of an American Whig, Stamp Tax Protests (Wilmington), Sons of Liberty, Non-Importation Movement, Merchants Committees of Inspection, The Justice and Policy of Taxing the American Colonies in Great Britain Considered, Provincial Convention (1775), Tories, John Alexander Lillington (c.1725-1786), Richard Dobbs Spaight (1758-1802), Archibald Maclaine (1728-1790), The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina, Philip Alston, John Penn (1741-1788), The Test, Port Act, Cornelius Harnett, Thomas Burke (1747-1783), David Fanning (1755-1825), William Richardson Davie (1756-1820), Polk County (1855), Lincoln County (1779), Randolph County (1779), Edgecombe County (1741), Guilford County (1771), Battle of Guilford Court House, Chowan County (1681), Nash County (1777), Battle at the Mouth of Sandy Creek, Battle of Plymouth (1864), Granville County (1746), Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, Royal Governor William Tryon (1729 - 1788), Tryon Palace, Royal Governor Josiah Martin (1737 - 1786), Battle of Cowan’s Ford (February 1, 1781), The Battle of Ramsour’s Mill (June 20, 1780), Food Lion, Prelude to the Battle of Averasboro, The Battle of Averasboro- Day Two, Plott Hound: The State Dog, House in the Horseshoe, Person County (1792), Onslow County (1734), Tyrrell County (1729), Cabarrus County (1792), Cleveland County (1841), Washington County (1799), Salem, James City, Wingate University, Historic Halifax, Chowan County Courthouse (1767), The National Hollerin' Contest, James “Catfish” Hunter (1946 - 1999)
Related Commentary: Edenton Tea Party: An American First, When Wilmington Threw A Tea Party: Women and Political Awareness in Revolution-Era North Carolina, Revolutionary Characters: What Made the Founders Different, 1771 Alamance: The First Battle of Our American Revolution, Defending Liberty From The Bench, Defending Liberty From the Bench

Timeline: 1866-1915 , 1916-1945 , 1946-1990 , 1990-present
Region: Coastal Plain

© 2014 John Locke Foundation | 200 West Morgan St., Raleigh, NC 27601, Voice: (919) 828-3876
Website design & development by DesignHammer Media Group, LLC. Building Smarter Websites.