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The Daily Tar Heel Encyclopedia

One of the premier college newspapers in the United States, the Daily Tar Heel started publication in 1893. UNC students originally paid 5 cents per issue for the weekly newspaper.  The newspaper is now a free daily. Some of North Carolina’s most well-known writers and publishers edited the Daily Tar Heel.  Notables include Thomas Wolfe, Frank Porter Graham, and Jonathan Daniels.

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Josephus Daniels (1862 - 1948) Encyclopedia

Josephus Daniels was a prominent journalist and newspaper editor from North Carolina. He purchased the Raleigh News and Observer in 1894 and became a leading “New South” political commentator.  He was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson to serve as Secretary of the Navy during World War I.  He later served as ambassador to Mexico under President Franklin Roosevelt.

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Dare County (1870) Encyclopedia

Dare County, one of North Carolina’s coastal counties, has a rich history with national significance.  Named for America’s first English child, Virginia Dare, this northeastern county was originally part of the Tyrrell, Hyde, and Currituck Counties. In 1870, the North Carolina Legislature passed an act that separated Dare County to make transportation improvements as well as an increase in taxing procedures.

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Virginia Dare (1587-?) Encyclopedia

Virginia Dare was born on August 18, 1587 at Roanoke Island, Virginia (present-day North Carolina). Virginia Dare was the first English-born child in the Americas. She was daughter of Ananias and Eleanor Dare and the granddaughter of John White.  As a member of the lost Roanoke Colony, Virginia Dare’s fate is unknown, but she has become an icon of American folklore.

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Virginia Dare (1587-?) Encyclopedia

Virginia Dare was born on August 18, 1587 at Roanoke Island, Virginia (present-day North Carolina). Virginia Dare was the first English-born child in the Americas. She was daughter of Ananias and Eleanor Dare and the granddaughter of John White.  As a member of the lost Roanoke Colony, Virginia Dare’s fate is unknown, but she has become an icon of American folklore.

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Davidson College Encyclopedia

Founded by the Presbyterian church in 1837, Davidson College was named in honor of General William L. Davidson, a Patriot soldier who died during the Battle of Cowan’s Ford. Early students helped develop the campus, but after a large endowment by Maxwell Chambers, Davidson College had the largest endowment of any college south of Princeton. Davidson College enrolls approximately 1,700 students, and it offers over twenty different majors.

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Davidson County (1822) Encyclopedia

Established in 1822, Davidson County is a central, Piedmont county in North Carolina. Davidson County has a rich history that dates back to the colonial era and is known for its furniture industries.  More than a few boast about the area’s distinct barbecue style that is exhibited at the annual Lexington Barbecue Festival.

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Davie County (1836) Encyclopedia

Located in the western Piedmont, Davie County is named in honor of an American Revolutionary Patriot, William Davie. The county was formed in 1836 from Rowan County, and the county seat is Mocksville.

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William Richardson Davie (1756-1820) Encyclopedia

Soldier, lawmaker, governor, and diplomat, Davie is best remembered as the principal founder of the University of North Carolina.  Despite his many accomplishments, Davie’s ardent Federalism fostered a growing voter disenchantment with him, and he spent his last years living in a self-imposed political exile.

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William Richardson Davie (1756-1820) Encyclopedia

A distinguished lawyer and Revolutionary War hero, English-born and South Carolina-raised William Richardson Davie served as the tenth Governor of North Carolina and was instrumental in founding the first public university in the nation, the University of North Carolina. Educated as a young boy at Queen’s Museum and Liberty Hall in Charlotte, Davie eventually matriculated at Princeton University and graduated in 1776, on the heels of the Revolutionary War.

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Thomas Henry Davis (1918-1999) Encyclopedia

 

Thomas Henry Davis was the founder of Piedmont Aviation, Inc., and innovator in commercial aviation. The company maintained facilities in Winston Salem NC, Greensboro NC, and Roanoke VA. Thomas Henry Davis’ management of the company led the airline industry in hub operations.

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De Soto Expedition Encyclopedia

Although scholars disagree regarding the exact path of Hernando De Soto’s expedition in the Southeast, all agree that the Spaniard passed through Piedmont and western North Carolina. 

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Battle of Deep Gully and Fort Anderson (Federal) Encyclopedia

After a Confederate victory at Fredericksburg, Lieutenant General James Longstreet was given the assignment to gather supplies and maintain supply lines for the North Carolina area.  Longstreet assumed control of the 45,000 men in the North Carolina and Virginia companies on February 25, 1863 and ordered General D.H. Hill, commander of the North Carolina district, and his 12,000 men from the North Carolina division, to regain control of New Bern.

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Susan Dimock (1847 - 1875) Encyclopedia

One of the first females to practice medicine in the United States, Dr. Susan Dimock was born in Washington, North Carolina in 1847. Dimock trained under a local doctor before moving to Boston after the Civil War. Although she was denied entrance into Harvard Medical School, she moved to Europe where she attended the University of Zurich. She practiced medicine in Boston for several years, but in 1875, at 28 years of age she died after her ship wrecked off the coast of England.

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Dismal Swamp Canal Encyclopedia

The Dismal Swamp Canal, originally chartered in 1790, connects the Albemarle Sound and the Chesapeake Bay. Opened in 1805, the Dismal Swamp Canal created a passage between northeastern North Carolina and Norfolk, Virginia. By the mid-1820s, the Dismal Swamp Canal was widened and deepened enough for reliable commercial traffic. As a result, international trade shifted from Albemarle Sound towns, like Edenton, to Norfolk, Virginia.  Today the Dismal Swamp Canal is primarily used for recreational boating.

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