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Ashe, Samuel (1725-1813) Encyclopedia

The Judge presiding over the landmark case Bayard v. Singleton (1785), Ashe served three one-year terms as Governor and was an ardent Federalist at the beginning of his term.  He soon supported state’s rights and Jeffersonian ideals.

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Asheboro Colored Graded School Encyclopedia

At the southwest corner of Central School, now known as “East Side Homes,” is a marble stone that predates the 1926 construction of Asheboro’s oldest existing African American school.  It reminds passersby about the first African American school in the Piedmont town.

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Asheborough Female Academy Encyclopedia

Much scholarly attention has been given to Alexander Murphy’s visions for public education in antebellum North Carolina and to the common school system in mid-nineteenth-century North Carolina; however, private schools existed in the period, too.  One such school was the Asheborough Female Academy.

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Asking The Right Questions Commentary

Some people never ask the right questions. Or even ask anything. Take science and government intervention, for example. Many progressive actions (whatever progress is, no one has defined it sufficiently for me) are nothing more than barbarism revived. Case in point: the eugenics movement in 20th-century North Carolina.

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Averasboro (Town of) Encyclopedia

On the Cape Fear River during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, only Fayetteville's and Wilmington’s populations outnumbered Averasboro’s.  Yet population and commercial growth were not inevitable.  Only a cemetery surrounded by a grove and a Civil War museum remind anyone that the port town once existed.

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Averasboro, Battle of (A Prelude) Encyclopedia

The Battle of Averasboro (also called Averysborough, Smith’s Mill and Black River) was the first deliberate, tactical resistance to the infamous march on federal forces through Georgia and the Carolinas. The battle was fought on the plantation lands of the John Smith family four miles south of the Cape Fear River village of Averasboro.

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Averasboro, Battle of (Day One) Encyclopedia

The Battle of Averasboro (also called Averysborough, Smith’s Mill and Black River) was the first deliberate, tactical resistance to the infamous march on federal forces through Georgia and the Carolinas. The battle was fought on the plantation lands of the John Smith family four miles south of the Cape Fear River village of Averasboro.

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Averasboro, Battle of (Day Two) Encyclopedia

The Battle of Averasboro (also called Averysborough, Smith’s Mill and Black River) was the first deliberate, tactical resistance to the infamous march on federal forces through Georgia and the Carolinas. The battle was fought on the plantation lands of the John Smith family four miles south of the Cape Fear River village of Averasboro.

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Avery County Encyclopedia

A county in North Carolina’s “High Country,” Avery was established in 1911 and earned the county the distinction as the hundredth-county in the state. One of the highest counties in the eastern United States, Avery County is in the Blue Ridge Mountains and is home to the man-made Linn Cove Viaduct and the natural-wonder Grandfather Mountain. Year after year, numerous tourists visit Avery, bringing over $50 million into the county’s economy annually.

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Ayllon, Lucas Vasques de (1475-1526) Encyclopedia

A lawyer and nobleman from Spain, Lucas Vasques de Ayllon sponsored the first Spanish explorations (three total) of what became North Carolina.  He also discovered Chesapeake Bay and established San Miguel de Guandape, a settlement near what would be Jamestown.  The wild horses of Shackleford Banks (near Beaufort) are reminders of Ayllon's explorations and failed attempts to settle in the land.

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B. C. Powders Encyclopedia

Commodore Thomas Council created one of the most popular headache powders in 1906 at his Durham pharmacy.  In 1910, it was renamed “B.C. Powder."

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Babb, James G. (1932- ) Encyclopedia

A native North Carolinian, James G. Babb was born January 1, 1932.  He graduated from Belmont Abbey College in 1959 with a degree in business and later achieved success in the communications industry.

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Backcountry Piedmont Lesson Plan

During the mid-1700s, the North Carolina backcountry (now known as the Piedmont) was much different than Eastern North Carolina.  Anglican itinerant Charles Woodmason of Charleston, South Carolina, “a missionary of English civilization,” went to the backcountry to convert Piedmont farmers and bring stability and order to a region where religious dissidents lived.  This lesson plan includes four selections from Woodmason's sermons and reports, a reading worksheet, and discussion questions for advanced students.

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Bailey Josiah Encyclopedia

Josiah Bailey was a leading figure in North Carolina’s progressive movement in the early twentieth century. In the 1930s and 1940s, he served as a Democratic U.S. Senator from North Carolina and co-authored the “conservative manifesto,” which defended fiscally conservative policy during the heyday of the New Deal.

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Baker John H. (1935-2007) Encyclopedia

John H. Baker served as North Carolina’s first African American sheriff.  He served in this office for twenty-four year and proposed one of Wake County's first charter schools.

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Baker, Ella (1903 - 1986) Encyclopedia

A North Carolina native, Ella Baker played a key role in the Civil Rights Movement and in forming the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee at Shaw University.  

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Bankhead Cotton Control Act Encyclopedia

The Bankhead Cotton Control Act was passed by the U.S. Congress on April 21, 1934. The act addressed an impediment to the Agricultural Adjustment Administration's efforts to raise cotton prices. The Agricultural Adjustment Act, which created the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA), explicitly made farmer participation in AAA programs voluntary. Most AAA programs compensated farmers for leaving land fallow, reducing supply and triggering a corollary price increase. Nevertheless, as some agricultural economists (such as Mordecai Ezekiel) had foreseen, non-AAA farmers could prevent price increases by flooding the market with cotton.

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Barden, Graham A. Encyclopedia

Graham Arthur Barden represented North Carolina’s Third Congressional District, which covered the Outer Banks and several coastal counties, from 1934 until 1960. His reaction to the New Deal was a typical North Carolinian one: initial support, giving way to deep suspicion.

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Barker House Encyclopedia

The Barker House was built in 1782 in Edenton, North Carolina, for Thomas and Penelope Barker. Penelope Barker presided over the notorious Edenton Tea Party on October 25, 1774.

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Barringer Gold Mine Encyclopedia

Historians claim the opening of Barringer Gold Mine was a watershed event.  Formerly one of the most important gold mines in 1800s North Carolina, the Barringer Gold Mine is remembered now mostly for being the first gold mine in the Southern Piedmont to use lode mining (pure mining from mineral deposits). 

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