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Sandy Creek Baptists Encyclopedia

Sandy Creek Baptists played a key role in the Regulator Movements in North Carolina (1766-1771) and in the tremendous growth of the Baptist denomination in the South.  Their free-will Baptist theology influenced the changing views regarding the common man in America during the late eighteenth century.

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Sandy Creek, Battle at the Mouth of Encyclopedia

Though the American army under Baron DeKalb camped for weeks at Buffalo Ford in the summer of 1780 on its way to Camden, and Lord Cornwallis in 1781 spent several days after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse at Bell’s Mill on Deep River, by and large the official history of the Revolutionary War bypassed Randolph County. But far more active and far more destructive was the guerrilla war which took place in the county between neighbors of opposite political persuasions.

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Sanford, Terry (1917 -1998) Encyclopedia

At the onset of the 1960s, Terry Sanford was elected the 65th governor of North Carolina. A lifelong Democrat, Sanford championed improving the state’s educational system at all levels, embodied the spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, strove to fight poverty, and desired to expand the Research Triangle Park. Despite serving only one term, Sanford’s programs transformed Southern politics, specifically in education and race relations, and contributed to his legacy as a political hero in the New South.

 

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Saponi Indians Encyclopedia

The Saponi Indian tribe is an eastern Siouan language tribe with ancestral land located in Virginia and North Carolina. The Occaneechi Band of the Saponi and the Haliwa Saponi are recognized by the state of North Carolina. The Saponi traveled in small tight knight communities and were avid corn farmers and hunters.

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Sarah Malinda Pritchard Blalock (1839-1903) Encyclopedia

Sarah Malinda Pritchard Blalock is one of only two women known for having served in any North Carolina Confederate regiment.

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Sawyer, Samuel T. (1800 - 1865) Encyclopedia

A lawyer, newspaper editor, state legislator, and U.S. Congressman, Samuel T. Sawyer is most known for being Harriet Jacobs’ lover.  He befriended and had a consensual relationship with the slave author of Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl.  Together they had two children.

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Scales, Alfred M. (1827-1889) Encyclopedia

Alfred Moore Scales was born on November 26, 1827 in Rockingham County on his family’s plantation, Ingleside. Caldwell first studied at the Caldwell Institute in Greensboro before transferring to the University of North Carolina in 1845. Scales studied law under the tutelage of Judge William Battle and passed the bar exam in 1852.

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Scarborough, John Clarence (187? - 1972) Encyclopedia

Born in Kinston, J.C. Scarborough was a grocer before becoming a mortician.  His business success allowed him to start various charities in the Durham area.

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Schoolmaster Yorke and The Tories Commentary

Offering a different interpretation than presented by B.J. Lossing in his groundbreaking Pictorial Field Book of Revolution, Randolph County historian Mac Whatley argues that historians should do further research and regarding the Regulator Rebellion and the story of David Fanning and Bay Doe. 

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Scotland County (1899) Encyclopedia

As its name suggests, Scotland County is a region steeped in Scottish heritage and history. Although the early Cheraw Indian tribes were the first in the area, the Highland Scots, along with English and Quaker settlers, colonized the region as early as the 1720s.

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Scott Encyclopedia

William Kerr Scott, from Alamance County was the governor of North Carolina from 1949-1953. As the first farmer-governor of the Tar Heel State since 1892, Scott spearheaded agriculture issues and emphasized building roads and expanding electricity into rural North Carolina. 

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Scruggs, Earl Encyclopedia

Considered “The Father of Bluegrass Music,” Earl Scruggs was born and raised in the mountains of North Carolina - Cleveland County, to be exact. Mastering the banjo at an early age, Scruggs later joined Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys and earned wide acclaim for his “Scruggs-Style Picking.” After his induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame, Scruggs retired with his wife to Madison, Tennessee.

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Seal, The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina Encyclopedia

North Carolina developed four different state seals during the colonial period and there have been six state seals since North Carolina declared its independence. While the Great Seal changed many times throughout North Carolina history, some variations on symbols have remained and appear on the current Great Seal.

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Secession Encyclopedia

Secession of the state of North Carolina from the American Union occurred on May 20, 1861; this date was chosen to celebrate the anniversary of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence of 1775.

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Secret Basketball Game of 1944 Encyclopedia

During the Jim Crow era, African American college teams were barred from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the National Invitational Tournament (NIT). But a brave few found ways around these restrictions. A secret game held in 1944 between a white team from Duke and a black team from NCCU was one of the first integrated sports events in the South.


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Segregation Did Not Stifle Self-Help Efforts in Black Communities Commentary

Self-help efforts are fascinating and laudable stories. A particularly interesting one is how, in an age of de jure segregation, charitable and creative African-Americans were agents of change in their communities and were able to alleviate various economic and social problems.

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Sevier, John (1745-1815) Encyclopedia

John Sevier arrived in western North Carolina during the troubled years just prior to the American Revolution. His leadership was crucial during the Cherokee offensive of 1776 and four years later at the Battle of King’s Mountain. Sevier went on to play central roles in three separate governments west of the Appalachians. His relations with the Cherokee were marked by military success but also marred by controversy. Even so, his leadership on the frontier was unquestioned and was an essential factor in the transition from North Carolina wilderness to Tennessee statehood.

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Seymour Johnson, Air Force, Base Encyclopedia

Founded in 1941, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base was named in honor of Lt. Seymour Johnson. During WWII, the base served as a important training center for bomber pilots, but the camp was closed after the war. Seymour Johnson was reopened in 1956 due to the work of local political leaders, and it has since remained home to the Fourth Tactical Fighter Wing.

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Sharp, Susie (1907-1996) Encyclopedia

Judge Susie Sharp was an old school Southern Democrat.  She publicly opposed the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) of the early 1970s and even attempted to persuade legislators to vote in the negative.  Some have credited her, along with her friend Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. (1896-1984), for playing a big part in defeating the ERA in North Carolina.

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Shaw University Encyclopedia

From its beginning in 1865, Shaw University has been a forerunner in starting educational programs among historically black colleges, and in 1960, it served as the birthplace of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) during the Civil Rights Movement.

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